Michelle Rodriguez Says Liam Neeson Could Never Be Racist Because Of THIS

Catherine Michelle

February 8, 2019

Liam Neeson has been in the headlines recently for a personal experience he shared. His story about being consumed with revenge over 40 years ago because of a woman he knew being the victim of rape and his anger at her assailant – a black man – created much controversy, as people began to call him out for being racist.

 

Now, Michelle Rodriguez is weighing in on the whole is-he-or-isn’t-he-racist discussion, coming to the 66-year-old actor’s defense.

 

At the amfAR Gala in New York on Wedneday (February 06), Michelle vehemently defended Liam, declaring that he absolutely could not be racist. As to how she came to that conclusion? Well, it has something to do with Liam’s on-screen interactions with Viola Davis, his co-star in their 2018 film Widows.

 

More specifically, it’s because of the kissing scene between Liam and Viola.

 

Here’s what Michelle said:

“It’s all f**king bullsh*t. Liam Neeson is not a racist. Dude, have you watched Widows? His tongue was so far down Viola Davis’ throat.

 

You can’t call him a racist, ever. Racists don’t make out with the race that they hate, especially in the way he does with his tongue — so deep down her throat. I don’t care how good of an actor you are.

 

It’s all bullshi*t. Ignore it. He’s not a racist. He’s a loving man. It’s all lies.”

 

That’s that.

 

The day before, on Tuesday (February 05), the New York City premiere of Liam’s new movie Cold Pursuit was cancelled amidst the major backlash he’s been facing since he spoke about his shocking story.

 

In an appearance on Good Morning America Tuesday morning, Liam stated that he is definitely not racist:

“I’m not racist. This was nearly 40 years ago, and because I was brought up in the North of Ireland and brought up in the Troubles, the ‘60s, ‘70s, and early ‘80s, there was a war going on in the North of Ireland, and I had acquaintances who were involved in the Troubles, the bigotry. One Catholic would be killed, the next day a Protestant would be killed. One Catholic pub would be bombed and then a Protestant pub bombed.

 

I grew up around that, but was never part of it.” 

 

He went on to say that he would have had the same furious reaction had the woman said she had been attacked by a white man:

“If she said Irish, Scot, a Brit, I know I would have the same effect. I was trying to show honor to stand up for my dear friend in this terrible medieval fashion.

 

I’m a fairly intelligent guy, that’s why it kind of shocked me, and then I came down to Earth after having these horrible feelings. Luckily, no violence occurred ever. Thank god.” 

 

Liam concluded by expressing his hope that his confession will open more honest conversations about these things:

“We all pretend we are politically correct. In this country, sometimes you just scratch the surface and discover this racism and bigotry and it’s there.”